Menu

Virtual Conference

A virtual forum for the Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorder community to learn and engage with each other throughout a variety of web-based sessions.

Schedule of Sessions

The Tourette Association of America’s Inaugural Virtual Conference will be hosted May 15 & 16, 2020. The Virtual Conference will provide a forum for the Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorder community to learn and engage with each other throughout a variety of web-based sessions. Information being presented is geared towards adults, parents, teens, educators and medical professionals in the TS community. Check out the schedule of events below for all sessions being offered, and register for the sessions you are interested in attending!

The 2020 Virtual conference is being offered free of charge, thanks to generous donors and sponsors alike. If you are interested in making a donation to help further TS programming, please click here. CEU credits are being offered at an additional rate. If you are interested, please click here.

Day 1: Friday, May 15

Yoga Flow + Meditation in Savasana

Kick-off day 1 of the TAA’s Virtual Conference with Yoga Flow + Meditation in Savasana with Danielle Natoni. Danielle is a TS advocate and mother of a TAA Youth Ambassador. In addition to her role as wife and mother, Danielle is a world renowned fitness expert and entrepreneur.

Adulting 101

This presentation is geared towards adults and teens and will cover resources and support available nationwide that are in place to support adults with disabilities, including Tourette Syndrome. Presenter Ellie Jarvie

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Adulting 101 led by Ellie Jarvie. Oftentimes, people are not aware of resources available nationwide that are in place to support adults with disabilities, including Tourette Syndrome. This session introduces systems of support. Specific resources to be covered include: Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Independent Living Centers, Protection and Advocacy Agencies, health insurance considerations, SSI/ SSDI benefits, and peer support. A focus will be on preparing the youth/young adult so they can best access services, and on developing a resiliency mindset.
Ellie Jarvie, MSW, LCSW is an adult with Tourette Syndrome. She has been involved in support and advocacy efforts since her diagnosis in the mid-1980’s, both on the State and National Level. As someone who had very noticeable symptoms from junior high through her early 30’s, she found that educating others about Tourette was a key accommodation for her success in school and in the workplace. Ellie has worked with youth and adults with a variety of disabilities, including extensive experience in community mental health programs. She has served as a foster adoptive and respite parent, sharing her home with over 20 youth. Her personal and professional experiences both serve as credentials for her presentation. Understanding programs and services from the provider and recipient role gives her the ability to provide information that is applicable in real-world settings. Ellie currently works as an advocacy specialist for Disability Rights Wisconsin.
Resiliency with Tourette

This presentation is geared towards adults, parents, and teens and focuses on skills and strategies that can help build resilience and improve quality of life. Presenters Dr. Joseph McGuire & Joseph Sexton

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Resiliency with Tourette led by Dr. Joseph McGuire & Joseph Sexton. Living with tics and Tourette’s Disorder is challenging. While beneficial treatments exist, learning to “deal” with tics is a daily reality for many patients and families. This presentation focuses on skills and strategies that can help build resilience and improve quality of life. Mr. Sexton will provide a personal account of finding resilience and perseverance from his adverse circumstances, explaining the tools and thought processes he engaged in order to find greater success. Dr. McGuire will discuss skills and strategies to build resilience skills in the context of treatment.

Dr. Joseph McGuire is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He has over 10 years of research and/or clinical experience in the assessment and treatment of Tourette’s Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), anxiety disorders, and related conditions. Dr. McGuire has received numerous national and international awards. He has co-edited three books with Elsevier, published over 90 peer-reviewed journal articles, and has given dozens of conference presentations. Dr. McGuire has gratefully received research support from the National Institute of Mental Health, Tourette Association of America, and the American Academy of Neurology.

Joseph Sexton (TAA Rising Leader, 2019) is a current first-year undergraduate student at Vanderbilt University, where he is supported by the university’s premier Cornelius Vanderbilt Scholarship, is a member of the College Scholars program, and is the founder and president of the Vanderbilt Alliance on Disability and Condition. Joseph was featured in the Atlanta Journal Constitution as his high school’s Most Outstanding Senior in May 2019 and has also received national and international recognition for his research on major depressive disorder; other notable accolades include acceptances to some of the United States’ most selective collegiate institutions, such as Harvard, Duke, and Notre Dame. He attributes much of his previous success and professional development to his ability to find resilience and persevere in the face of his Tourette and other perceived adversities.

Mindfulness for Tics

This presentation is geared towards adults, parents, and teens and outlines the ways mindfulness may be helpful for those living with tics, and guide participants through several mindfulness and meditation practices. Presenters Alan Brown and Dr. Hannah Reese

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Navigating Cultural Challenges led by Alan Brown and Dr. Hannah Reese. Mindfulness is an awareness that arises from paying attention to the present moment, nonjudgmentally.  Mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to help a range of different psychological and medical conditions. Recent evidence suggests that they may be helpful for individuals with tics.  

In this interactive session we will explain what mindfulness is, outline the ways in which practicing mindfulness may be helpful for those living with tics, and guide participants through two brief mindfulness and meditation practices.  All participants will be provided with resources for gathering further information and continuing to develop their own mindfulness practice.  No previous experience with mindfulness required.

A longtime teacher and administrator, Alan Brown serves on the faculty of Mindful Schools and is the founder of Learning to Thrive, an educational consulting firm that works with schools and school districts to create mindfulness and positive education programs. Diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome at age 11, Alan came to mindfulness as a high school teacher looking for stress reduction but quickly found the practices invaluable for tics. Alan is also the facilitator of TAA’s New York City Chapter’s Support Group.

Along with Hannah Reese, Alan is a co-developers of MBIT: a Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Tics, which they are currently studying through a TAA-funded research grant.

Hannah E. Reese, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Bowdoin College with more than a decade of experience as a tic disorders researcher and clinician. She has published numerous articles and chapters on the nature and treatment of the obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders and tic disorders specifically. She is a member of the Massachusetts General Hospital Tourette Association of America Center for Excellence team and has been the Principal Investigator of two TAA-funded studies examining the efficacy of a mindfulness-based intervention for adults with tics.

Navigating Cultural Challenges

This presentation is geared towards adults and teens and aims to provide a safe space to learn about positive coping mechanisms and strategies to navigate culturally specific challenges. Presenter Michael Chichioco

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Navigating Cultural Challenges led by Michael Chichioco, TAA Rising Leader. Many aspects of culture such as beliefs, traditions and familial mindsets can all intersect with Tourette’s Syndrome and have a significant impact on the way an individual copes with the challenges presented to them. As a Filipino-American college student diagnosed with Tourette’s Syndrome since age 5, l I’ve dealt with culturally specific challenges related to TS, particularly with finding a common ground of acceptance and understanding with my family and cultural community. During this session, I plan to speak about my experience with Tourette’s Syndrome as a Filipino-American, hoping to shed light on the impact varying cultures may have on an individual with Tourette’s Syndrome.

Michael Chichioco is a 22 year old student pursuing a major of Biochemistry and minor of Psychology at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. Michael, trained as a Tourette Association Youth Ambassador (2014) and Rising Leader (2019), has shared his story with Tourette’s Syndrome at many academic institutions and is devoted to spreading awareness about Tourette’s Syndrome to everyone he encounters. Additionally, Michael also presented a TEDxyouth talk, “Living with Tourette’s: Finding the Flip Side” and was featured as a guest on KQED Forum’s segment “Living with Tourette Syndrome”.

As a college student at Northeastern University, Michael has facilitated numerous workshops and small group discussions regarding the cultural challenges that many Asian-American students may have encountered in their experiences with disabilities and mental health. Michael constantly strives to empower others through sharing his story and hopes to spread positivity everywhere he goes.

What Your Care Team Needs to Know

This presentation is geared towards adults, parents, and teens and will provide ideas to help you keep track of interventions and medications along with the response to provide to your physician. Presenters Sandy Price and Meghan Turner

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is What Your Care Team Needs to Know led by Sandy Price and Meghan Turner. Ever wonder how to make the best use of your care team? When you walk into an appointment do you report all is well even though there are issues and you just cannot remember at the time? We will provide you with what information your doctor needs to best work with you and/or your child. We will present ideas to help you keep track of interventions and medications along with the response to provide to your physician.

Sandy Price has been in the field of psychiatric nursing for 35 years working inpatient mental health. Since 1999 she has worked alongside our psychiatrist with individuals with Tourette. She is co-author on an article, Tourette Refresher and coordinator for the CofE in Kansas City, MO.

Meghan Turner has been the lead nurse in the Center of Excellence at Children’s Mercy in Kansas City since 2014. Prior to that she was in the Neurology department.

Dylan C. Brady Guest Speaker and Performance

Dylan C. Brady is a singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist who uses his platform to encourage young kids to feel empowered despite their differences. On his journey, Dylan has already caught the attention of Zac Brown Band and Rascal Flatts’ Joe Don Rooney. Tune-in for a Facebook Live as he talks about his life with TS and offers a musical performance.

At only 20 years old, Dylan Brady is the much-buzzed-about accomplished singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist who has already caught the attention of Zac Brown Band and Rascal Flatts’ Joe Don Rooney, as well as industry veteran Barry Weiss, who immediately signed Dylan to his Sony joint-venture, RECORDS LLC. Brady’s debut song “Over Us” reflects the New York native’s unique perspective, combining his pop melodies with heartfelt country lyrics.

The catchy up-tempo track Rolling Stone called a “radio-friendly anthem” was co-written by Brady together with Jared Scott and producer Andy Sheridan and released in partnership with Riser House/Columbia Records. Since its release last month, the song has already amassed over 1 million in consumption across streams and views. His latest heartbreak ballad, “I Hate California” written by Brady and Scott is available now. Off the stage, Brady uses his platform to encourage young kids to feel empowered despite their differences after being diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome at age 13. For more information, please visit dylancbrady.com or follow him on Instagram @dylancbrady, Twitter @dylancbrady and on Facebook @dylanbradymusic.

Day 2: Saturday, May 16

HIIT Training Workout

Kick-off day 2 of the TAA’s Virtual Conference with a HIIT Training Workout with Danielle Natoni. Danielle is a TS advocate and mother of a TAA Youth Ambassador. In addition to her role as wife and mother, Danielle is a world renowned fitness expert and entrepreneur.

Is This Normal?

This presentation is geared towards parents and educators and aims to provide the community with access to a neurologist to answer common questions. Presenters Amanda Coffman and Dr. Keith Coffman

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, Is This Normal? is led by Amanda Coffman and Dr. Keith Coffman. When two of our three children were diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome at a young age, we realized that to survive as parents we were going to have to expand our definition of the word “normal.” Many of our children’s quirks are shared by others with Tourette — making them normal in the world of Tourette. Normal is the opposite of problematic or disordered. Therefore, whatever is normal is not meant to be changed or altered, but rather accepted. In my clinical practice I have a wide angle lens on Tourette Syndrome. I see what other children and families struggle to understand and for what they must compensate. Therefore, I am able to help others — particularly my wife — understand the new Tourette spectrum of normal. Through a series of text messages between my wife and me, we will share several instances of “normal for Touretters.” This will span the areas of clothing, food, public behavior, sleep and sensory integration. Participants will have the chance to ask me my wife’s most frequent question: Is this normal? They will thereby gain a greater appreciation of the lovable quirks that form the Syndrome in Tourette Syndrome.

Keith A. Coffman, MD is a Board-Certified Child Neurologist. He is Director of the Tourette Syndrome Center of Excellence at Children’s Mercy Hospital. He is also the Co-Chair of the Tourette Association of America Medical Advisory Board.

He is the proud father of three children, two of whom have Tourette. Both of his children with Tourette were born after her had dedicated his career to the treatment of children and teens with Tourette Syndrome.

Amanda K. Coffman, MEd, is an educator with a master’s in educational psychology from the University of Connecticut. She has more than 20 years of experience as an educator in the public, private, and therapeutic settings. She is currently a Middle School teacher in the Shawnee Mission School District.

The Present and Future of Therapeutics for TS

This presentation is geared towards medical professionals and the general public and will review the established treatments, explore investigational treatments, and provide an update on cannabinoids and surgical treatments for TS. Presenters Dr. Jimenez-Shahed, Dr. Malaty and Dr. Lehman

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is The Present and Future of Therapeutics for TS led by Drs. Jimenez-Shahed, Malaty and Lehman. This workshop will review the established treatment spectrum for tics in TS, will explore investigational treatments that are in the pipeline for treating tics, and will provide an update on the current status of cannabinoids and surgical treatments for TS.

Dr. Jimenez-Shahed serves as Chair of the Functional Neurosurgical Working Group of the Parkinson Study Group, and is the lead investigator for a national quality improvement registry for patients undergoing DBS surgery for Parkinson’s disease. She is also an investigator with the Huntington Study Group, Dystonia Coalition and TSA International Database of DBS Studies in Tourette syndrome. She currently serves on the Science Advisory Board of the Davis Phinney Foundation and the Medical Advisory Board of the Tourette Association of America and has chaired the Medical Advisory Board for the Houston Area Parkinson Society. She has served as Principal Investigator for industry-sponsored and investigator-initiated clinical trials and has authored several papers and book chapters.

Rebecca K. Lehman, MD is Associate Professor of Neurosciences (Pediatric Neurology) and Director of the Pediatric Neurology Residency Program at the Palmetto Health – USC Medical Group in Columbia, SC. She obtained her medical degree from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and remained at the University of Rochester for her Pediatrics preliminary years, Child Neurology residency, and Movement Disorders fellowship. Clinically, she treats pediatric patients with a wide variety of movement disorders, including Tourette syndrome, dystonia, chorea, tremor, ataxia, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. She was awarded the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism and Excellence in Teaching Award in 2008 and was nominated for the American Medical Student Association’s and College of Medicine’s Golden Apple Award for excellence in medical education in 2011.

Dr. Malaty completed movement disorders fellowship at the University of Florida before joining the UF faculty. She devotes her practice to clinical care, research, and education across the movement disorders spectrum. She specializes in Tourette syndrome (TS) in patients of all ages and is director of the Tourette Association of America Center of Excellence at UF. She is a member of the International Tic and Tourette syndrome study group of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. She also specializes in the care of Parkinson disease (PD) and is director of a Parkinson Foundation Center of Excellence at UF.

Dr. Malaty is a primary investigator in a number of trials in movement disorders and helps direct the movement disorder trials at UF. She has authored multiple publications and chapters in movement disorders.

In 2017, Dr. Malaty became the first female president of the Florida Society of Neurology. She currently serves as vice-chair of the movement disorders subsection of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and is an invited member of the AAN science committee. She was selected for the inaugural class of the prestigious Women Leading in Neurology program of the AAN.

Understanding Disinhibition and Difficult Behaviors

This presentation is geared towards parents and educators and aims to provide an awareness and understanding of disinhibition and the complex symptoms that are often viewed as purposeful misbehaviors. Presenter Kathy Giordano

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Understanding Disinhibition and Difficult Behaviors led by Kathy Giordano. Symptoms of Tourette and the common co-occurring challenges are often linked to disinhibition. An awareness and understanding of disinhibition will assist parents and educators respond to the complex symptoms that too often are viewed as purposeful misbehaviors.

Kathy Giordano has been a Tourette Association’s Education Specialist since 2003. She has a background in teaching Grade 7-12 English and was the Coordinator for The Tourette Education & Support program from 1995 to 2014 at The Advocacy Center in Rochester, NY. Additionally, Kathy owned and operated Tourette Plus, providing educational and behavioral consultant services to school districts and human service agencies. For over thirty years, she has presented internationally regarding Tourette Syndrome, Functional Behavioral Assessments and positive/proactive behavioral management plans. Kathy has authored numerous resources including co-authoring “A Family’s Quest for Rhythm”, “Support and Guidance on Education Issues for Clinicians” and CDC Education research articles

Suicidality in Youth with Tic Disorders

This presentation is geared towards medical professionals and the general public and aims to highlight potential factors contributing to suicide rates and discuss treatment options and early intervention strategies. Presenters Dr. Barbara Coffey, Dr. Adam Lewin, and Dr. Joseph McGuire

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Suicidality in Youth with Tic Disorders: Raising Awareness and Readiness To Respond led by Dr. Barbara Coffey, Dr. Adam Lewin, and Dr. Joseph McGuire. According to parent-reported data from the 2018 Tourette Association of America (TAA) Impact Survey, children with tic disorders have an alarmingly high rate of suicidal ideation/self-harm—182 of 567 responses (32%) reported experiencing these symptoms. We aim to highlight potential factors contributing to these rates and discuss treatment options and early intervention strategies.

Barbara Coffey is an internationally known specialist in tics, Tourette’s Disorder and related disorders, such as ADHD and OCD. Dr. Coffey assumed position of Chief of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine October 1, 2017 and is currently Director of the TAA Center of Excellence. Dr. Coffey was former Chief of the TAA Center of Excellence at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at ISMMS, and Research Psychiatrist at the Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research in Orangeburg, New York.

Dr. Coffey served on the faculty of Harvard Medical School and was Director of the Tourette’s Clinics at McLean and Massachusetts General Hospitals in Boston between 1992-2001, and Director of the Tics and Tourette’s Program and Associate Professor at New York University School of Medicine between 2001-2012.

Dr. Coffey is the author of more than 150 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals, abstracts and book chapters. Co-Chairman of the Medical Advisory Board of the Tourette Association of America, Dr. Coffey’s research has focused on the clinical course, psychiatric comorbidity, phenomenology, and novel treatments of Tourette’s Disorder.

Dr. Lewin is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry and Interim Chief of Pediatric Neuropsychiatry at the University of South Florida. He is a board certified child and adolescent psychologist who directs the Rothman Center for Neuropsychiatry, a specialty clinical research program for Tourette and OCD Spectrum Disorders. His research focus is in OCD, Tourette, Anxiety and Autism and he has grants from the CDC and TAA focused on Tic Screening and Intervention

Dr. McGuire is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He has over 10 years of research and/or clinical experience in the assessment and treatment of Tourette’s Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), anxiety disorders, and related conditions. Dr. McGuire has received numerous national and international awards. He has co-edited three books with Elsevier, published over 90 peer-reviewed journal articles, and has given dozens of conference presentations. Dr. McGuire has gratefully received research support from the National Institute of Mental Health, Tourette Association of America, and the American Academy of Neurology.

A Ten-Year Follow-Up of Youth from the Original Trial of Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics

This presentation is geared towards medical professionals and presents outcomes from a ten-year follow-up of youth who participated in the original CBIT trial. Presenters Dr. Flint Espil and Dr. Emily Ricketts

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is a Ten-Year Follow-Up of Youth from the Original Trial of Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics led by Dr. Flint Espil, Jennifer Schild and Dr. Emily Ricketts. Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics is a first-line behavioral treatment for Tourette Syndrome. There is a lack of information regarding its extended long-term therapeutic benefits. This symposium presents outcomes from a ten-year follow-up of youth who participated in the original CBIT trial.

Flint M. Espil, Ph.D. is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences within the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Espil’s research focuses on anxiety, tics, and compulsive behaviors within youth, with particular emphasis on phenomenology, assessment, and the dissemination of behavioral interventions for these disorders. His research incorporates behavior therapy, functional brain imaging, and brain stimulation techniques. Dr. Espil holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He also completed his predoctoral internship at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and his postdoctoral fellowship (NIMH T32) at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Espil has received funding from the TAA, American Academy of Neurology, and the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation.

Emily Ricketts Ph.D. is a Clinical Specialist in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at University of California, Los Angeles, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, and a member of the newly-established Tourette Association of America (TAA) Diversity Committee. Dr. Ricketts received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee following completion of a clinical internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She joined the Child Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program as a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH T32) Postdoctoral Fellow in 2014. Her research centers on the relationship between sleep and circadian disturbance, symptom severity, and underlying neurocognitive mechanisms in Tourette’s Disorder and obsessive-compulsive-spectrum (e.g., hair pulling disorder, skin picking disorder) disorders. Her research incorporates multimodal assessment of sleep and circadian rhythms including self-/parent-report, wearable sleep monitoring and salivary melatonin assessment. She has received funding from the NIMH, and TAA to evaluate circadian rhythms and the effects of short-wavelength wearable light therapy in youth and adults with Tourette’s Disorder.

Improved Classroom & Homeschool Communications

This presentation is geared towards parents and educators and will discuss the importance of effective communication, components of effective communication, the relationship between effective communication and social and emotional learning (SEL)skills. Presenters Susan Courey, Ph.D. and Robin Elliott-Ghalleb, Ed. D.

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Improved Classroom & Homeschool Communications led by Susan Courey. Teachers may learn about disability and special education services in a preparation program, they likely receive little to no training about TS and co-occurring conditions like ADHD, OCD. When teachers and home-schooling parents are aware of TS, they can help educate other service providers in schools and local communities. In this way, teachers can increase understanding of the symptoms, reduce teasing, and decrease stress for students and families with TS. In this session we discuss the following: 1) the importance of effective communication, 2) components of effective communication; and 3) the relationship between effective communication and social and emotional learning (SEL) skills.
Susan Courey, Ph.D. is currently the Chair of the Early Childhood Special and General Education Program at Touro Graduate School of Education. Dr. Courey earned her Ph.D. in Special Education at Vanderbilt University, where she began a line of research on teaching and learning mathematics for children with learning challenges. Prior to taking on her position at Touro GSE, Dr. Courey was an Associate Professor of Special Education at San Francisco State University (SFSU) and Mild/Moderate Program Coordinator within the Department of Special Education and was awarded Professor Emeritus. Her research interests continue to be in the areas of mathematics and learning challenges, Universal Design for Learning, teacher preparation, autism and exceptionality. Dr. Courey is currently working on program improvement for teacher preparation. Robin Elliott, Ed.D. is currently the Director of Sanford Programs at Long Island University in Brooklyn. In this role, she supports the training and implementation of Sanford Harmony Social Emotional Learning Program within hundreds of schools and afterschool organizations in the Tri-State Region. Dr. Elliott provides weekly professional development sessions on Social Emotional Learning and strategies to increase cultural competencies for educators and youth development facilitators. Additionally, she is an adjunct professor in the Graduate School of Education at Touro College in Manhattan, New York. Dr. Elliott has over 26 years of teaching and administration experience in New York City and South Carolina. Prior to her position at Long Island University, she managed Sanford Programs at National University and Touro College. She was the founding Special Education Coordinator at Harbor Science and Arts Charter School in East Harlem, New York from 2003-2011. Her passion is supporting the emotional intelligence of educators, families and students, with an emphasis on those affected by poverty and adverse childhood experiences. Her most recent qualitative research titled Factors that influence the Retention of Urban, Hispanic Male Graduates is in publication.
Management of Co-Occurring Conditions

This presentation is geared towards medical professionals and the general public and aims to highlight common co-occurring conditions and present guidelines for treating these co-occurring conditions based on empirical support and clinical expertise. Presenters Dr. Erica Greenberg and Dr. Joseph McGuire

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Beyond Treating Tics: Management of Co-Occurring Psychiatric Conditions led by Dr. Erica Greenberg and Dr. Joseph McGuire. Many children, adolescents, and adults with Tourette syndrome experience co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. Common co-occurring conditions include obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and disruptive outbursts amongst others. In this presentation, Drs. Greenberg and McGuire will describe common co-occurring conditions and present guidelines for treating these co-occurring conditions based on empirical support and clinical expertise.

Erica Greenberg, M.D. is a child/adolescent psychiatrist at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Dr. Greenberg is the Director of the Pediatric Psychiatry OCD and Tic Disorders Program at MGH and a Co-Director of the Tourette Association of America MGH Center of Excellence. Her interests include Tourette syndrome (TS), OCD, “Tourettic OCD,” ADHD and body-focused repetitive behavior disorders (BFRBs). She is the primary investigator on a study evaluating a behavioral treatment for those with tic disorders and ADHD, and she has authored several peer-reviewed manuscripts on TS, OCD, and related disorders.

Dr. Greenberg graduated from Weill Cornell Medical College (with Alpha Omega Alpha honors), and completed her general psychiatry residency at Harvard Longwood and her child/adolescent fellowship training at Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean where she served as chief resident in both programs.

Dr. McGuire is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He has over 10 years of research and/or clinical experience in the assessment and treatment of Tourette’s Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), anxiety disorders, and related conditions. Dr. McGuire has received numerous national and international awards. He has co-edited three books with Elsevier, published over 90 peer-reviewed journal articles, and has given dozens of conference presentations. Dr. McGuire has gratefully received research support from the National Institute of Mental Health, Tourette Association of America, and the American Academy of Neurology.

Taking Tourette to College

This presentation is geared towards parents and teens and will provide resources and information for college-bound students with Tourette, along with insights and strategies for success. Presenters Matt Sawyer, Sara Hamilton, and Jane Hamilton

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, Taking Tourette to College is led by Matt Sawyer, Sara Hamilton, and Jane Hamilton. This interactive discussion will provide resources and information for college-bound students with Tourette, along with insights and strategies for success. Led by a University Admissions Advisor who has Tourette, the session will include a rep from a University’s Disability Services Offices, a parent advocate, and a high school senior with TS who is currently going through the process of choosing a college.

Matt Sawyer is an Academic Advisor for undergraduate students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. His career is focused on supporting and advocating for students and their success in college and beyond. He graduated from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor with a B.A. in History and Vanderbilt University with an M.Ed. in Higher Education, Student Affairs. Having Tourette Syndrome himself, he understands the difficulty of navigating the education system, from elementary school through graduate school.

Sara Hamilton is a film producer, marketing strategist, professional speaker and workshop facilitator who has held principal roles in innovative, industry-leading firms and non-profit organizations around the country. She’s also a dedicated volunteer advocate and devoted parent of an incredible teenage daughter with Tourette Syndrome. As a Board member of the Minnesota Chapter of the Tourette Association of America and a member of the Twice Exceptional Children’s Network, Sara spends her time raising awareness for Tourette and other neurological conditions throughout the state and around the country through presentations, workshops and media outreach.

Jane Hamilton is a high school senior who was chosen as the Minnesota Youth Ambassador for the Tourette Association of America in 2017. Jane is an active TS advocate and accomplished public speaker. Her advocacy work has been highlighted on “Inside Edition”, and local and regional news papers and TV stations. Jane is also interested in languages, acting, art, music and science, and she will be attending college in 2020. She is currently a research intern at the University of Minnesota Converging Approaches to Neurodevelopment (CAN) Lab, where she studies ways to use technology to engage the TS community in research.

Understanding the American Academy of Neurology Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Assessment and Treatment of TS

This presentation is geared towards medical professionals and aims to help individuals affected by Tourette Syndrome understand the rationale behind guideline recommendations and facilitate self-advocacy. Presenters Dr. Tamara Pringsheim and Dr. Doug Woods

This session, part of the Tourette Association of America’s Virtual Conference, is Understanding the American Academy of Neurology Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Assessment and Treatment of Tourette syndrome led by Dr. Tamara Pringsheim and Dr. Doug Woods. In 2019, the American Academy of Neurology published their first clinical practice guideline on the assessment and treatment of Tourette syndrome. The guideline provides evidence-based recommendations with the goal of improving the standard of care for people affected by Tourette syndrome. In this presentation, faculty will guide attendees on the comprehensive evaluation of people with tics, and the evidence to support the use of behavioral therapies, pharmacological treatments and deep brain stimulation. Led by three of the guideline authors, the presentation aims to help individuals affected by Tourette syndrome to understand the rationale behind guideline recommendations and facilitate self-advocacy.

Dr. Tamara Pringsheim is an Associate Professor with the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences at the University of Calgary. She is the program lead for the Tourette and Pediatric Movement Disorder program at Alberta Children’s Hospital and the Deputy Director of the Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education. She also works as an evidence-based medicine methodologist for the American Academy of Neurology.

Dr. Pringsheim completed her residency in neurology at the University of Toronto and a fellowship in movement disorders and neuropsychiatry at the Toronto Western Hospital, and her Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology. Her research program is focused on rational pharmacotherapy for neurological and mental health disorders, using knowledge synthesis and translation strategies. She has developed clinical practice guidelines and tools for clinicians, and nationally implemented educational curricula with the goal of improving the safety, effectiveness and appropriateness of care.

Dr. Douglas Woods is currently Professor of Psychology and Dean of the Graduate School at Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI. Prior to that he was Head of Psychology at Texas A&M University from 2013-2015, and a faculty member, Chair of Psychology and Associate Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee from 1999-2013. Dr. Woods received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Western Michigan University in 1999 after completing his internship at Boys Town and the Nebraska Internship Consortium. Dr. Woods has authored or co-authored over 270 papers or chapters, and authored or co-authored 9 books on Tic Disorders, Trichotillomania, and other repetitive behavior problems. Dr. Woods has received over $6 million in extramural funding from the NIMH and other funding sources. Dr. Woods is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. He was the first non-physician to ever chair the Tourette Association of America’s Medical Advisory Board and serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Trichotillomania Learning Center.

David Ahmanson

The Frank J. Antun Foundation