Category: Resources & Support

Diversity Committee

The TAA has recently established a Diversity Committee dedicated to investigating and addressing these disparities. We would like to hear from you! Please submit your thoughts on how we can better and engage and serve the diverse needs of the TS community.
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Bullying Prevention

Join us for an afternoon webinar on Thursday, February 7th given by Julie Hertzog, Director of PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center and leader in bullying prevention.
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Bullying is Nondiscriminatory in How it Discriminates

Those who bully are not always the stereotypes portrayed in movies and television shows. While many people think bullying is demonstrated by individuals such as Regina George (Mean Girls) or Biff Tannen (Back to the Future), too often they aren’t an obvious living, breathing typecast. The same can be said of the individuals who are the targets of bullying - they are not always the smallest, weakest, ‘unpopular’ children. There are many forms of bullying and it happens largely due to a lack of understanding or knowledge about something that may appear different. The truth is it can happen to anyone, by anyone regardless of the age or setting.
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10 Things Employers Should Know About Their Employees with Tourette:

10 things employers should know about their employees with Tourette: Written by Pat O’Leary, Developer Relations Engineer with Havok and adult living with Tourette Syndrome 1) Tics are not representative of someone’s inner thoughts or desires. The notion that the tics of Tic Disorders like Tourette are related to hidden or suppressed urges has been thoroughly debunked years ago. Tics may seem contextual, but the urge to move or make noise comes at random without any underlying need. 2) Tics are not constant. Some days your employee may appear less symptomatic than other days. That doesn’t mean they aren’t struggling with less visible tics or other invisible symptoms of Tourette. 3) Encourage ‘flow’ states. Many people with Tourette find that mentally engaging activities can help control tics. Keeping their to-do list loaded with appropriately challenging tasks to their skill level can encourage the sort of calm focus that ease the symptoms of Tourette. 4) Minimize distractions. Many kinds of sensory stimuli can interrupt ‘flow’. Unexpected noises, movements, smells, or even simply tapping someone on the shoulder to talk when they’re otherwise engaged can really challenge someone’s ability to manage their symptoms. To that extent, some prefer email or instant messaging
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TAA Spotlight: Lynette LaRocca

TAA Spotlight: Lynette LaRocca. As Accounting Coordinator, Lynette is responsible for accounts payable and receivables for the Association. Read more about Lynette.
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Webinar: Occupational Therapy for Tic Disorders

Webinar: Occupational Therapy for Tic Disorders. May 16, 2018 from 6:00 - 7:00PM EST. Hosted by the Tourette Health and Education Program, occupational therapists Dr. Heather Simpson and Dr. Tana Carson will address the many ways occupational therapists can improve living with Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders.
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Webinar: Friendships and Tourette Syndrome

Webinar: Building Friendships as Children and Adolescent. Presented by TAA Education Advisory Board Member, Dr. Jennifer Stenger from 7-8PM EST on April 25, 2018. Suggestions and strategies on interacting with peers in social situations will be discussed.
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Webinar: TS & Co-Occurring Conditions

Webinar: Tourette Syndrome and Co-Occurring Conditions on March 19, 2018 given by Dr. Michael B. Himle
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