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Dear Friend, I am excited to share updates on progress being made on behalf of our resilient community. We’ve launched a new donor exclusive series that delves deeper into advancements made as a direct result of your contributions. There has always been a heightened need for access to TS programs and offerings that support underserved areas across the US. In our current state, we have tripled offerings to ensure everyone – underserved or locally supported by a TAA Chapter or Support Group – can have the access that is so desperately needed.
In the last several weeks we've seen a spike in outreach to the TAA encompassing stories related to workplace, housing and corporate discrimination. This is not something our community is unfamiliar with, but the national spotlight on similar topics reminds us that we must equip ourselves with knowledge. It is important to understand your rights and when they are being violated. Later this month is the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This landmark civil rights law extended the right for our community, and many others, to access public places, businesses, and to participate in the same everyday activities as other citizens. In celebration, there is a free webinar on July 29 highlighting workplace accommodations and disability rights which we hope you will attend.
The upcoming school year will be vastly different in light of COVID-19. Whether classes are held in-person or virtually, the Tourette Association of America is here to provide you with resources and tips for every type of classroom setting. We understand that there is not a one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to school this year. School attendance is particularly unique. Everyone has different ideas and opinion.  Know that the choices you make are what's best for you and your family. To help guide you into the new school year, members of the TAA's Education Advisory Board have offered advice on best practices that will help reduce anxiety and give some predictability and routine to the school year.
In the last several weeks we've seen a spike in outreach to the TAA encompassing stories related to workplace, housing and corporate discrimination. This is not something our community is unfamiliar with, but the national spotlight on similar topics reminds us that we must equip ourselves with knowledge. It is important to understand your rights and when they are being violated. Later this month is the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This landmark civil rights law extended the right for our community, and many others, to access public places, businesses, and to participate in the same everyday activities as other citizens. In celebration, there is a free webinar on July 29 highlighting workplace accommodations and disability rights which we hope you will attend.
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed by Congress and signed into law by President George Bush, Sr. The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else. This includes Tourette Syndrome, which is a neurodevelopmental disorder that becomes evident in early childhood or adolescence characterized by uncontrollable motor and vocal tics.