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Category: Teen

Pumpkin October TouretteConnect
It's October, and while many of us are making plans to celebrate Halloween we cannot ignore some important causes the month sheds light upon. October is National Bullying Prevention Month, ADHD Awareness Month and OCD Awareness Week. Tourette Syndrome is an extremely layered and complex disorder and remains so vastly misunderstood among the general public. There is no one-size-fits-all approach, and because of this, the TAA partners with like-minded organizations that support our efforts. I encourage you to reflect on your journey with Tourette Syndrome and if you’ve been impacted by any of the above, please send us your personal story to help us join their efforts in elevating awareness for TS and co-occurring conditions.
YouGotThisWEb
If there’s one thing Tourette’s knows how to do well, is being unpredictable, and everything changes all the time. For me, tics got relatively worse after my teens, and the (um, literal) pain of it is what shocked me enough to do some digging into “what is up with me”. But, I guess I’m pretty used to ticcing by now. It’s something I’ve done since I was 9, as far as I remember, and it can be annoying, and the absolute worse, but also, just fine. What I never saw coming, though, was how wild the *other* side of Tourette’s would get for me. Because it’s not just tics...
September TouretteConnect web header
The month of September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. I am grateful for the continued public awareness and open discussions about this very serious topic. In a recent Impact Survey led by the TAA, an alarming 51% of adults and 32% of parents of children with TS reported to have considered suicide or participated in self-harming behaviors. In light of this, there are a number of helpful organizations (AFSP, NIMH, NAMI) and resources to support you and your loved ones, including Chapters and Support Groups across the country. Please know that if you need help, there is always someone to call. A Support Group Leader from the TAA Florida Chapter shared a personal story about how suicidal thoughts impacted her family that really hit home for me.
Presentation
The Tourette Association of America (TAA) Tourette Syndrome Health and Education Program (THEP) delivers presentations and educations across the nation to the people in the Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorder community, the general public, physicians, allied professionals, and school personnel. After an intense and unfortunate bullying situation occurred, Albuquerque’s Public Schools sought out an education opportunity to enlighten students and administrators. Representatives from TAA traveled to New Mexico on September 10 and 11 to deliver a powerful educational experience about Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders to nearly 1,000 people.
bridge
Alexandra Cuttler and Jack Carlin are TAA Youth Ambassadors for the New York – Hudson Valley Chapter, having been trained in 2018 and 2019 respectively. Through their proactive efforts, they started the Project Lights initiative, which was their mission to light up the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge (formerly the Tappen Zee Bridge) teal for the final day of Tourette Syndrome Awareness Month. This was no small task for Jack, Alexandra, and their families. The project began back in March, when the group began mapping out the process they would undertake.
Katie D TS by the numbers
I'm Katie Danis. Pleased to meet you. I'm an undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I run a public health and sex ed YouTube channel with two of my best friends. I'm training for an ultramarathon. And at age two, I was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome. I've had the privilege of sharing my story in essay, Buzzfeed article, and video format. However, I've never attempted to quantify my condition. I've never identified the numerical impact of my TS or the life it affects. Until now.
Eliana 3
Dear Tourette Association of America, Thank you so much for sending us so much stuff for this program at my school. We could not have done this program without you. We are very grateful. The program is the first annual Ability Day at my school. What they do is they get people to set up a booth. Then other people will come over to learn about the ability that they are talking about. There is one side where you are just talking to the people, but the other side is where you talk to people and provide a demonstration of what it feels like to have this ability. We are on the side where we talk and have a demonstration.